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Off-Premise Spending Increased in 2018

In the off-premise, total spending on food and beverage has increased 4.29 percent for the year through August, with spending on alcohol growing slightly slower than the overall food and beverage category at 4.15 percent. Beer still accounts for the most dollars spent off-premise on alcohol, but is growing slightly slower than wine and spirits. Beer sales increased by 4.13 percent, wine increased by 4.14 percent and spirits increased the most up 4.19 percent in the last year. Liquor stores showed a large increase in both on and off-premise outlets to 5.48 percent in the last year. Warehouse clubs and supercenters were also up in the 5 percent while supermarkets and grocery stores were up 3.56 percent for the year. Source: winespiritdaily.com, October...

On-Premise Spending Accelerates in 2018

Total spending on-premise increased up to 9.2% in August. Alcohol beverage accounts increased total spending on-premise for about 25%-26% and nearly 8% for the period. For the year, full service restaurant sales increased by 4.7%, while limited service restaurants increased by 2.8%. Source: winespiritdaily.com, October...

TTB: Avoiding Common Errors on Alcohol Beverage Labels

The government of health warning statements is one of the most common problems the TTB sees on alcohol beverage labels that causes them to have to send those COLA applications back for correction is errors in the mandatory health warning statement, including punctuation and formatting problems. The following health warning statement must appear on all alcohol beverages for sale or distribution in the U.S. that contain 0.5 percent or more alcohol by volume: GOVERNMENT WARNING: (1) According to the Surgeon General, women should not drink alcoholic beverages during pregnancy because of the risk of birth defects. (2) Consumption of alcoholic beverages impairs your ability to drive a car or operate machinery, and may cause health problems. See the regulations in 27 CFR part 16 for the full rules about how to meet the health warning statement labeling requirements and speed your label approval process. Source: TTB, October...

Byrd v. Tennessee: Supreme Court Revisit The Case Of Interstate Wine and Spirits Shipping

The U.S. government is willing to reevaluate how wine and spirits are sold, both within and between various states in the country after 10 years of speculation. The case of Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association v. Clayton Byrd (Tenn. v. Byrd) is the second time a process like this has passed by the Supreme Court since the repeal of Prohibition in 1933. The U.S. government decided to regulate alcohol sales was by giving each state the right to decide how wine and spirits were sold within its borders after Prohibition was repealed. As a result, the legal arrangement in every state has a fractured method of handling the sales and shipment of alcohol. Washington and Pennsylvania among other states have a set up control state monopolies where the government is charged with the sales alcoholic beverages. Since then Washington and other states have since privatized their wine sales model. Byrd v. Tennessee was initiated by Total Wine & More’s desire to expand and open a retail location in Tennessee. According to state legislation, the chain is not be permitted to do unless the owners are residents of the state. The case will reevaluate the legal process for alcohol interstate shipping. Retailers, with brick-and-mortar locations in distant states, had long been allowed to ship into other states set in motion by the 2005 Supreme Court case of Granholm v Heald. Technically, wineries are still legally allowed to ship into multiple states because of Granholm but a legal loophole pursued by wholesalers and in-state retailers have made it difficult to hit the market by out-of-state stores.   Source: Forbes, October...

American brandy is on the rise

Brandy refers to a variety of spirits such as Cognacs and Armagnac, since they are distilled from grape wine, while Calvados and other apple brandies are distilled from cider, and other fruit brandies are derived from berries and tree fruits. The brandies considered to be the most popular are those that are barrel-aged since they turn a brown color and have a strong aroma. To further popularize California brandy, there has been a push for it in the cocktail scene. By pushing more brandy into the cocktail world, this could lead to more inclusion to drink recipes as opposed to the common use of whiskey or rum. In addition to that, educating consumers by emphasizing the “terroir” of brandy, similar to that of California wine, has proven successful. Another implemented strategy was to create a “straight brandy” category similar to straight bourbon, with additional legal requirements regarding production, to help drive the premium association. Source: WSJ, October...

California Wineries will be allowed to post photos to social media ahead of special events

Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law on September 22nd assembly Bill 2452 allowing wineries and alcohol producers the opportunity to post pictures on social media of the venue before the event. The bill was introduced to update the rule that prohibited alcohol producers from posting pictures of a venue hosting an alcohol marketed event, such as a wine tasting. Source: winebusiness.com, October...